Newsletter, October 2017

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Minutes

Simpson Scholarship Report

Property Ctte Report

Hospitality Report

William Penn House Report

Upcoming Events

Comics

 

Friends Meeting of Washington

Monthly Meeting for Worship with a Concern for Business

September 10, 2017

Query for Worship Sharing: How do we live our testimonies of peace and community in times of turmoil and division? What prevents me from seeing that of God in everyone?

            A Friend shared his experience of traveling during the eclipse, considering the ways in which we minimize other folks who are not from the same cultural/political/geographical circles as ourselves, and found it wonderful to be around people who shared kindness with strangers and were willing to be kind to him. Friend felt it was a reminder to remember that of God in each person, and, having been enriched by the experience, to consider how you can relate to strangers each day, bringing greater happiness and peace to the world. Friend also enjoyed discussing life as it’s lived, rather than just the news and daily happenings in the world.

Welcome of Visitors

Thirty-seven people were present as the Meeting opened at 12:15 p.m.

We welcomed Erin Murphy, who is also serving as interim recording clerk; Friends approved her service.

Clerk’s Report

The Clerk noted that we will have Pastor Parfaite Ntabuha, a visiting minister from Burundi, discussing issues facing Quakers in that country, including the genocide that occurred there in the 1990s. The minister will also be speaking at American University at the Chapel on the following Tuesday at 7:00 p.m., hosted by Gene Throwe (who serves as Quaker chaplain at the University), the Center for Diversity and Inclusion, and the University’s Peace/Conflict Resolution Department.

- The wedding of Sarah Radomsky and Sasha Rindisbacher was accomplished in good order yesterday.

- The Search Committee, responsible for suggesting members for the Nominating Committee, needs to meet.  Steve Coleman, a member of the Search Committee, has tendered his resignation, which Friends accepted. Anyone interested in serving in on the Search Committee should speak to the Clerk.  

- Our Black Lives Matter banner has been replaced.

 

- In the lead-up to the President’s decision to rescind DACA, a federal policy designed to prevent expulsion of undocumented immigrants who arrived in the United States as children and who meet a number of strict requirements, Friends brought sandwiches, snacks, and water bottles to the vigilers outside the White House and helped collect names on their petition. Friends are urged to work with their Senators and Representatives, if they have any, to protect 800,000 DACA-recipients from detention or deportation and push for a pathway to citizenship through the immediate and clean passage of S. 1615/H.R. 3440, the Dream Act of 2017.

 

- Houston Friends Meeting has established a Fund for Sufferings for Friends affected by Hurricane Harvey. If you would like to contribute toward hurricane relief, you may send your check to Live Oak Friends Meeting, 1318 W. 26th St., Houston, TX 77008, noting "Fund for Sufferings, hurricane relief" on the check.

 

- First Day School is off and running. Please bring your children and their friends for this fun and meaningful time each week.

 

- On Saturday, September 16, The Vigilance Project will present an all-day symposium in our Meeting Room on “Aesthetic, Social, Political & Economic Resistance to Enslavement: The Antebellum Black Church.” The Project particularly wanted to hold this symposium in a Quaker meetinghouse because of the long history of Black people and Quakers working together to resist enslavement. Their website is www.vigilanceprojectdc.org

 

- Next Sunday, September 17, Friends are invited to join a lobbying workshop with Hannah Graf Evans, Legislative Representative for Immigration at the Friends Committee on National Legislation to learn how individuals can provide effective messages designed to transform our relationships with our federal elected officials toward more just immigration policies. The workshop will provide the tools Friends need to take action on the federal level on immigration, including information on the current state of policies in Congress and the Administration on immigration issues and a hands-on practicum for conducting a lobby visit.

 

Major Business

Renewing the alcohol policy – Brian Lutenegger/Merry Pearlstein 

Merry and Brian expressed their gratitude to the Meeting for the extra months given to prepare their report, a copy of which is attached to the Minutes.

This report is more detailed than strictly necessary, but the goal was to be as transparent as possible and to give a sense of the journey of continual revelation as the Meeting gains experience. Merry noted that FOPs at events where alcohol is served are being asked to go beyond their usual work, trainings have been held to give them the skills to do so. The 9 events held so far have run smoothly with no major issues.

The report contains information on financial aspects of permitting alcohol to be served. A $400 portion of the $10,000 amount has been pledged as a donation to organizations that work to mitigate the events of alcohol abuse. We are currently providing low-cost space to Al-Anon. Going forward, we have committed to giving a donation to organizations in addition to or in lieu of that space use.

Merry thanked Debby Churchman, the Meeting’s Administrative Secretary, for doing much of the work involved in ensuring that events occur without incident. Merry and Brian expressed their hope that the Meeting would be open to extending or even making permanent, the policy.

A Friend remarked that the report is excellent, asking what happens if someone at an event drinks too much. Merry responded that the event contract requires that a responsible person be identified – not the bride - to be the main point of contact. In the event that that person or the bartender don’t do what they are supposed to do, we empower the event host/FOP to make periodic inspections and insist, if necessary, that the person who has had too much to drink be asked to leave and call a cab for them. Friend asked who passes the word about the person who has had too much – is it the FOP or another person in the group? Merry indicated that the primary responsibility for this rests with the host.

Another Friend rose in strong support to make the proposal permanent. Friend reflected on the strength of the report, and its reflection on the long history of Quaker work on the negative effects of alcohol. Friend is very much in support and hopes that this proposal will serve as a good example of how to meet the needs of meetings elsewhere in the country that are considering similar issues.

Friends approved the permanent approval of the alcohol policy. Thanks were expressed to Merry, Brian, the Property Committee, and Debby for their work on this policy.

Authorization for Increased Lending for Renovation – Robin Appleberry

Robin reported that Trustees seek to increase the borrowing limit for our mortgage for the renovation project. In July, revised estimates were received for the construction that increased the cost by about $900,000, amounting to about $600,000 over the original borrowing limit. Friends are working on bringing that cost down as much as possible, with some preliminary success, but it is not expected to bring it back down to previous level. The borrowing limit does not necessarily mean that we will borrow the entire amount;,the hope is that the costs might come down as details are finalized.

The Capital Campaign Committee, Capital Improvements Task Force, Finance Committee, Property Committee, Trustees, and Committee of Clerks met on August 27th to consider what course of action to follow. The group examined two alternative scenarios -  one optimistic and the other pessimistic. There was an acknowledgement that delays in the past have increased cost, that fundamental change on the project would have a negative impact on fundraising and community spirit, that doing nothing is not an option, and that trying to lop off pieces of the project would be difficult and ultimately not sensible (the project is all intricately connected at this point). There was also a feeling that short-term cost savings at the expense of long-term improvements did not make sense either financially or as an expression of our values. These all contributed to agreement by everyone at that meeting that the project should proceed and that Meeting for Business should be asked to approve a higher borrowing limit.

A Friend asked what happens if we don’t approve the borrowing limit increase, and specifically does that mean the construction exclusively is impacted or that funds from elsewhere in the budget would be redirected to deal with shortfall in the construction budget?

Robin responded that we have a mortgage now, signed by Dan on behalf of the meeting, and the bank has offered to increase the borrowing limit. We need to finish construction in 2018 to comply with the terms of the mortgage. If we don’t proceed with the construction for any reason, we’d have to cancel the mortgage. There could be several lengthy discussions about what the next steps would be in that case. We’ve also raised quite a bit of money already and under the law, if we don’t use it we’d have to return it – which would be a huge hit to our reserves, since much money has already been spent. Another Friend informed us that many of the figures we have for construction are still estimates. Once the contract is signed, things can still change significantly. The budget includes an allowance for unexpected costs even after construction starts. If we left the limit where it is, we’d have the money for the contract but no money for buffer room. If we raise the money and don’t need it, we don’t have to borrow it/use it.

- Friend enquired it it is likely to affect other programs supported by the Meeting if we did not pass the increase and the money had to come from other places?

The answer is yes; it would have a huge impact. The clerk of Finance & Stewardship explained the Finance budget, about $20,000 of which goes to other organizations, and if we ran into problems where we needed the money, then we would have to look first at money spent on those programs. We would then look further.

- Another Friend, who is a contractor, spoke about the two questions folks usually ask when they take on a building project: how long will it take and how much will it cost? The answers are: as long as you’ll let me be here, and everything you’ve got. Friend expressed a gentle reminder to be careful what you budget because they will be here as long as we’ll put up with it and it will cost everything we’ve got.

- A Friend shared thoughts on lessons to be learned from Baltimore Yearly Meeting, especially the Camp Catoctin bathroom project. The construction cost half a million dollars over budget; many people in the BYM community offered low-cost loans in order to make the project happen. There are ways to learn from Quaker resources and history that we should look into. Perhaps we could consult with Langley Hill, our local neighbors, or others.

- A Friend supports raising the borrowing limits, but expressed surprise that there isn’t a report on paper for something of this magnitude. Friend also shared that he feels that if we do not complete this project, then it is immoral for us to continue to operate in a space that is so inaccessible to our community. Friend feels that if we do not continue with this project, we would be obligated to sell the property and find another location.

- A Friend supports the increase, and coming out of meetings with the trustees and committees, Friend felt relieved that finally there was a plan. Friend wanted to point out that we have been looking on this for the last 12 to15 years, and now that we are finally here. Meeting members should recognize and have confidence in the work that so many within our community have done to reach this place. Friend has confidence in the management team to move forward sensibly. Friend also recognizes the nervousness that surrounds the undertaking of a project of this size and the concerns of increasing costs related to construction realities. Friend noted that the Unrelated Business Income Tax (UBIT) may be applied to some of our rental revenue. We have been seeking clarity on that issue, but are still waiting for a definitive response from tax experts. Finally, Friend expressed concern with us as a meeting and with our spirit/unity as a community moving forward. Friend hopes that we will continue to be a close congregation, despite the commercialization of the property that is necessary in order to be able to accomplish our financial goals. He hopes that we remember that we are a faith-based community with social activist goals that won’t be lost in this process. The need to raise money can create conflict, and Friend hopes that when it does, we can solve it with love and friendship as a part of the decision making process.

- A Friend asked for a show of hands for persons who did not attend the meeting, and also the persons under age 50 in the room. About half of the people in the room had attended the joint meeting. Only 7 of those attending were under 50. Friend said she would like to understand how we would pay for this increase with events. The fear is also that the meetinghouse, which is packed with events – mostly small non-profits that can barely afford the current cost – would be lost and necessitate us bringing in slicker, larger organizations with more money. How will it be paid for?

Robin responded in two parts: 1) A reminder to trust friends. Representatives from many committees all came together to work on this – including very cautious people. Those friends looked at the numbers, and were clear. Trust the answer that the friends who have done the work come back with.

2) There is a very significant issue for clerkship in our meeting. We have people dealing with their own issues of all types, which impacts the leadership available from our volunteer clerks and leaders.

- A Friend noted that spending money to make the building accessible means that we are a financial and real estate concern. The decision was made 5 years ago to move forward; that issue is no longer on the table.

- Another Friend indicated that increasing the borrowing limit really means looking at increasing the spending budget by about $350,000. We have already spent money. What happens if we don’t improve it – we haven’t seriously asked the question. This is the project budget, so if we don’t increase the limit, we will either have to walk closer to the line or go back (which is hard to foresee). Since we approved the last increase, good news has also come in – including a very large contribution and event income coming in about $60,000 over budget with no change to programming. Eventually, we will max out on potential income, but the plan for paying for it has not largely changed since the plan in May. The major source of event rental increase is coming from fairly expensive wedding rentals, which we cannot do currently but will be possible after the construction. Not necessarily more events or displacing weekly events, but higher priced events. We are not talking about suddenly bringing in groups outside of our values and kicking out non-profits.

Merry clarified that her projections are based on the use of the space for weddings and life celebrations. She has spent time checking in with other wedding venues in the area; many places are booked through 2018 and charging about $6-10k. We are not aiming that high. The hope is that five years from now, we would be able to host 35 weddings in a year at $5,000 a piece, which seems conservative in comparison to other venues. Increased costs may arise, including staffing, but Merry feels very confident in the ability to do that.

- A Friend, who is clerk of the trustees, took responsibility for the lack of paper report today. Friend spoke about the enormous amount of written reports and documentation provided in the history of the project, and spoke to the work done of the committees overall who have gone through these reports in great detail.

Debby Churchman has stood aside from the decision. Friends approved the borrowing limit increase.

Simpson Scholarship Annual Report – Anne Kendall

Anne presented on the Simpson Scholarship; a copy of the report is attached to these minutes. Congratulations to this meeting for their contributions! Also congrats to Bethesda and Langley Hill who are reaching out and raising money and making it happen. We have eyes on Adelphi. Thanks to Debby and Laurie Wilner, who are crucial to the program’s success.

All students who receive scholarships are truly in need. Anne hopes that we will keep these 5 students in the Light as they fight their uphill battles. We are able to help these kids get a great start.

Questions:

- A Friend raised two points. One, who is on the Committee from our meeting? Two, Friend is amazed at the wonderful job that is being done with the scholarship. Friend liked the summary and the descriptions of the students, and liked the summary of those who’ve had funds in the past.

Anne recognized Faith Williams, J.E. McNeil, Barbara Monahan, and Bill Strein – as well as members from Bethesda Friends Meeting and Babs Williams from Langley Friends Meeting.

- A Friend recognized Anne’s dedication to the scholarship. Over the years, Anne has spear-headed the Simpson Fund group, keeping it going.

- A Friend asked a question about getting around colleges taking money away from recipient students. Some options have included taking care of loans or trying to figure out how to pay for food for students who run short of funds.

Anne spoke about those struggles, and trying to give the money to the students AFTER colleges have made their financial decisions. However, all students have to report all the money they’ve come into. From the students, they perceive that their indebtedness is reduced by the program regardless.

- A Friend mentioned asking students to disclose their financing plans. Part of the process is determining how they can reduce their sub/unsubsidized loans as much as possible. The goal is to help them understand changing the mix to reduce unsubsidized loans. Also, during the year, if something happens – like a computer breaking – we have given donations directly to students, which they are then responsible for reporting. We have also provided other non-monetary support, like helping to put a new screen on a laptop. Also mentoring.

- A Friend recognized the two lunches run by Anne as well.

- A Friend mentioned that recipients used to come to Meeting once they were awarded, and expressed the wish for them to come to meeting at least once. A Friend would like to encourage us to ask “what can we do to make this less segregated” and encourage them to meet us here without forcing them necessarily.

Anne informed that there is a tea in July that meetings are welcome to come to, which serves to connect the recipients and the meeting members.

Friends accepted the report with gratitude.

Bill Strein shared that one of the recipients is undocumented, and asked everyone to please hold her in the Light.

Property Committee Report – Brian Lutenegger/Merry Pearlstein

Brian presented the Property Committee Report, a copy of which is attached to the minutes. This is a small committee that accomplishes a gret deal. Members include Brian Lutenegger, Merry Pearlstein, Jay Harris, Justin Kwong, Alex Matthews, Ken Orvis, and David Miller.

Major projects this past year have included restroom work in Carriage house, Decatur Place room, Debby’s office, looking into furnishings, reupholstering sofas, and getting new chairs for use across campus. The committee is on the lookout for new art or furnishings that are reasonably priced. Kitchen compost began last fall, with Veteran’s Compost. We are moving forward with solar panel installation as approved in July. Gender neural restroom signs were installed. The committee is also working on plans to upgrade and renovate and expand the assembly room as we move along.

Longer-term projects include addressing sound issues in the Meeting room and rental income –event rental income of FY17 exceeded budget by $56,000 but were under for long-term rentals. So far in FY18, we are currently on budget for events. We will see a drop-off, but for now, we are in good shape. Thanks to Ken for his work, Debby for her event work, and Neil for support in technology.

Friends are ready to accept the report.

Questions:

- A Friend asked about the solar panels.

Brian answered that we are moving forward with them! Neil noted that it does bring up an issue from July, asking for an extension for MfB by another month. Friends approved the extension.

Hospitality Committee Annual Report

Susan referenced the written report. This committee is hard-working and thorough. The biggest issue is not enough hands, so we need a few more hands to put into place when someone can’t be in the kitchen. This could be a rotation/floaters system. Susan would happily talk to anyone with an inclination to float. Please approach Susan, Todd, or the committee to sign up.

Friends accepted the report.

Other Business

William Penn House Report to FMW

Andrei Israel, Executive Director of William Penn House, gave a report, a copy of which is attached to these minutes. Penn House was founded 51 years ago by this meeting. Judy Hubbard has recently completed a 6 year appointment to the board, among others in the meeting.

- Resolved the property tax dispute with the DC governor that had been looming and threatened the future viability. A compromise was reached and all are able to go forward. Thanks for prayers!

- Now focused on mission of supporting Quaker peace and justice activism; it’s been a lively year! Especially in the 9 months since the election, the question has come forward: how can we support the new sense of citizen activism that’s arising? This includes supporting marchers who are here for one-day events that aren’t using accommodations but finding different means of hospitality. Women’s March estimates were about 1,400 people who came through to use bathroom, sit, eat, and chat. Really convinced that the work of creating space is needed and valuable.

- Create educational experience where young people can engage with issues of peace and justice; seen growth in those areas, and people are seeking those opportunities. Participation is up.

- This week, a group of activists came from Charlottesville to DC and filled the house on Wednesday. There’s also a group coming in from University of Washington to learn about human rights for a week-long seminar. In the midst of a lot of work!

- Grateful for FMW’s support and resources, both organizationally and individual. 35%ish of the budget comes from contributions.

Questions:

- A Friend expressed concern that fewer and fewer friends are attending monthly potlucks, and was wondering what the barriers are to people attending?

Andrei answered that an important part of the Penn program is public events that are open to community to learn about the work. Penn House is in discernment about how best to do that. The monthly potluck series is on sabbatical this year because of low participation; Penn House has not been successful in designing and marketing events in meaningful ways. Discussions should be had about opportunities for inreach and outreach, about ways for us to come together. Tweaking in the format, topics, logistics could be useful.

- A Friend reiterated how important the Penn house is to the DC Quaker community. It serves many functions, and as discernment is going on, Friend urges your support both monetarily and participation-wise.

Friends accepted the report.

Nomination of Trustees – Todd Harvey

Nominating submits the following names for a second, 6-year term as Trustees:

Daniel Dozier (M)

William Foskett (M)

Mark Haskell (M)

Martha Solt (M)

Faith Williams (M)

Todd Harvey reminded Friends that Trustees’ terms run from October 1 to September 30 each year.

Friends approve the 5 people listed above each for a second 6-year term.

Nominating Committee proposed David Miller to a 3 year term ending in 2019; Friends approved.

Report back from Annual Sessions – David Etheridge, Debby Churchman

Debby shared that there was a wonderful woman who was dressed in an outfit entirely made of plastic bags. We were asked by an earthcare committee to stop using plastic bags. We have a year to do this. Debby feels that she can do so, and is learning to use her cloth bags. P&SC brought forward a minute encouraging diplomacy vis-à-vis North Korea which was approved and put to use immediately.

David’s words: Lots of things happened. For the first time, children attended annual sessions free of charge for 8th grade and under, which made it more affordable for families. Sabrina and David led morning bible studies using 4 types of studies. There were well-attended interest meetings on providing information on how many young people attend meetings and how many people who attend meetings identify as white or POC. FMW had a high level of participation in the survey; Bertie Rossert put it together. For the second year, a Friends of Color group convened. Also, another group worked on identifying barriers for participation by people of color. A group worked on mass incarceration, and this saw the start of a serious Quaker effort in VA. There was a meeting across meetings who were working on Sanctuary issues, which started a listserv. Other sessions led by FMW Friends included Mary Campbell on vegetarian/veganism and perspectives on who Jesus is/was by Marsha Holliday.

Questions/Comments:

- A Friend spoke about enjoying the location of Hood College for annual session, and spoke to the event as a wonderful opportunity.

- A Friend asked if it will be at Hood College again next year, and we think the answer is yes! This is particularly helpful since it is accessible by MARC train!

Friends accept the report from annual sessions.

Friends approved the Meeting minutes.

The meeting closed at 2:30 p.m. with 28 people in attendance.

 

 

 

Annual Report of the Mary Jane Simpson Scholarship Fund

 Friends Meeting of Washington

September 2017

 

Introduction

The Mary Jane Simpson Scholarship Fund has given a total of 121 scholarships to deserving students in the District of Columbia to enable them to attend college.  All seniors in DC Public Schools can apply. The scholarship is awarded to students with

  • Major financial need;
  • Strong values and contribution to the community;
  • Good academic standing (GPA, class rank, AP classes);
  • Demonstrated drive and determination to succeed in college;
  • Demonstrated success in overcoming past obstacles.

The Friends Meeting of Washington established the program 36 years ago, and has since been joined by Bethesda Friends Meeting and Langley Hill Meeting. A committee comprising members and attenders of the three meetings jointly manages and mobilizes financing for this scholarship fund. The committee members contact public schools to raise awareness of the scholarship opportunity, select recipients, manage the funding, provide mentoring to scholars, and make decisions about the program’s policies and practices.

The scholarship award is now $6,000 per student: $1,500 per year for freshmen through senior years.  For 2017-2018, we have disbursed $2,000 to seniors rather than $1500. When we have extra funds it is our intent to give added support to those who have worked hard to get to senior year. We commit to support students through their four years of college. To maintain eligibility each year, students must submit their college transcript, proof of enrollment for the next school year, and a letter discussing the successes and challenges of the last school year.

This year we will give out a total of 18 scholarships because two of our students are stuck and may be working this year rather than attending school. Nevertheless we are trying to stay in contact with them, assuring them that when they are able to return to school, their scholarship will still be available.

The New Freshmen

 

 This June, we selected five students who demonstrated strong academic potential, inspiring community service, and significant financial need.

 

To respect their privacy, we are listing only the students’ first names in this report.

 

1. Ahmad has been a student at the Seed School. We were impressed by his strong academics with a GPA of 3.9 and 6 AP Courses. He has attended summer enrichment courses at both Duke in 2015 and Stanford in 2016. Ahmad is a self- directed learner with a particular interest in math. He figures out what he needs to know and then learns it. During the interview we discovered that his older sister is also a Mary Jane Simpson Scholar. They are both immigrants from Somalia and both will be attending Virginia Tech. Ahmad wants to major in civil engineering in part because his father had to put aside his hopes of being an engineer when the family left Somalia. Ahmad intends to do a work-study program at Virginia Tech.

2. Enjolique impressed us by how hard she is working at school and in two internships despite serious family challenges. At McKinley Technical High School, she has achieved a 3.3 GPA and took 2 AP courses. Each week this year she worked 15-20 hours at the World Bank. This summer she had an internship at Clark Construction from Monday to Friday and worked at TJ Max on Sunday and Saturday.  In her “free time” she has worked on a toy drive with Upward Bound, worked at a local food bank and cooked for people in shelters. Her teachers describe her as a student with a high level of commitment to her community. Enjolique will be attending North Carolina A & T. Enjolique has had a challenging family life. She is one of six children who was raised by her older sister after the parents left or could not care for their children. She wants a career in business or fashion. When asked what she does for fun, she looked somewhat perplexed.

 

3. Hao is an immigrant from China who attended School Without Walls. We were impressed by his energy and drive. He translates at the Chinese Cultural Center and has helped his parents run their business. He realizes that he will need to continue helping his parents when he goes to college. Hao also works as a busboy at Chinese restaurants and he has been active in a film production club and photography club. Hao has been fortunate to have a teacher who has been an inspiration for him. This art teacher worked for 8 years to get his college degree and has gone on to get two masters degree. Hao feels that if he can do this, Hao can too. Hao will be attending George Mason and will do a work study program.

 

4. Olivia has been a student at Duke Ellington where she carried a full academic load and after 2 pm took a full program of acting classes. Despite her heavy load she has maintained a GPA of 3.3 and taken 2 AP courses. For several years she has had two jobs, at 21st Century Fox and Friends of the National Zoo. She also was a student intern at The Washington Post.  In 2015 she attended the British American Drama Academy Midsummer Conservatory Program at Wadham College in Oxford. In the summer of 2016 she studied French language immersion in Senegal. She is very interested in women’s empowerment. She wants to use film to “expose the ugly truths hidden throughout the world” and “lessen mass ignorance.” She will attend Noropa College for one year and then go to Hawaiian Pacific University.

 

5. Tyrese graduated from Cesar Chavez Public Charter School with a 3.3 GPA. He has been living on the streets and in shelters with his mother ever since they were evicted from their apartment. During this difficult period when his mother lost her job, they were forced to use up all the family savings which makes him very vulnerable as he heads off to college. Tyrese says of himself, “I am not just a survivor, I am an overcomer.” Tyrese powered on regardless of his circumstances and did well academically. He has been a mentor to the children in his neighborhood, worked on the Brady campaign, was on student government and played varsity soccer. His 12th grade thesis was entitled, “Police Brutality in African American Communities in DC, MD and VA.” He will attend Ithaca College where he wants to major in physical therapy.

 

 

 

Mentoring for Students

Now in addition to giving each student a mentor from our committee, each student has an older student as mentor. This is our second year and we will see how it goes. The students all seem to enjoy our tea in early July.

Summary Data

MJS 2017 Applications by School

 

 

Schools in Alphabetical Order

School

Applications

2017 Scholars

Anacostia H.S.

1

 

Ballou

0

 

Banneker

6

 

BASIS PCS

0

 

Calvin Coolidge H.S.

0

 

Capital City PCS

4

 

Cardozo H. S.

3

 

Chavez - Capitol Hill

2

 

Chavez - Parkside

3

1

Columbia Heights Ed Campus

3

 

Duke Ellington

5

1

Dunbar

0

 

E. L. Haynes PCS

2

 

Eastern Senior H. S.

0

 

Friendship Collegiate Academy

1

 

Friendship Tech Prep

1

 

IDEA PCS

3

 

Kingsman Academy

0

 

KIPP DC College Prep

13

 

Luke C. Moore

0

 

Maya Angelou PCS Evans H. S.

0

 

McKinley Tech

20

1

National Collegiate Prep

0

 

Paul International

0

 

Perry Street Prep Academy PCS

0

 

Phelps ACE High School

5

 

Richard Wright PCS

0

 

Roosevelt H. S.

2

 

School W/O Walls

2

1

SEED PCS

6

1

Thurgood Marshall Academy

1

 

Washington Latin

3

 

Washington Math, Science Tech

4

 

Washington Metropolitan H. S.

0

 

Woodrow Wilson

2

 

Woodson

3

 

Total

95

 

 

Schools by Number of Applications

School

Applications

2017 Scholars

McKinley Tech

20

1

KIPP DC College Prep

13

 

Banneker

6

 

SEED PCS

6

1

Duke Ellington

5

1

Phelps ACE High School

5

 

Capital City PCS

4

 

Washington Math, Science Tech

4

 

Cardozo H. S.

3

 

Chavez - Parkside

3

1

Columbia Heights Ed Campus

3

 

IDEA PCS

3

 

Washington Latin

3

 

Woodson

3

 

Chavez - Capitol Hill

2

 

E. L. Haynes PCS

2

 

Roosevelt H. S.

2

 

School W/O Walls

2

1

Woodrow Wilson

2

 

Anacostia H.S.

1

 

Friendship Collegiate Academy

1

 

Friendship Tech Prep

1

 

Thurgood Marshall Academy

1

 

Ballou

0

 

BASIS PCS

0

 

Calvin Coolidge H.S.

0

 

Dunbar

0

 

Eastern Senior H. S.

0

 

Kingsman Academy

0

 

Luke C. Moore

0

 

Maya Angelou PCS Evans H. S.

0

 

National Collegiate Prep

0

 

Paul International

0

 

Perry Street Prep Academy PCS

0

 

Richard Wright PCS

0

 

Washington Metropolitan H. S.

0

 

 

 

 

 

Name[1]

University

Status

Mercedes

Xavier University

Graduated in 2015, in 5 years.

Started Xavier School of Pharmacology in 2015. (Finished 2nd year in spring 2017)

Yolande

Trinity Washington University

Graduated with a Bachelors of Science in Nursing (BSN) in 2015.  She passed the NCLEX board exam and is now a Registered Nurse.  Had a baby girl (Promise) in early August 2016. (Lives with her fiancé and mother.)

Nosa

Hampton College

Graduated from Hampton in spring 2014.  He is an entrepreneur in the fashion field (started this in college).  He custom designs and produces items for individuals and organizations and has a luxury clothing line.

Vincent

Temple University

Graduated in May 2014 with Bachelors in Kinesiology. Works full time as Gym Supervisor at Fortaleza Fitness Center in Philadelphia. and part time as a group exercise instructor.

Jeanifer

Rutgers University

Graduated in May 2014 with 3.5 GPA. From June 2014 to present, Research Coordinator at Memorial Sloan Kettering, Dept of Immunotherapy (Trials).  Starting 2017, entered MSc Program in Health Policy and Economics at Cornell University.  From 2014-Present, President/Founder of Partners for a Health Africa, 501c3, helping poor communities in Nigeria and US to deal with malaria and vision impairment.  [Mentor to Enjolique]

Marcus

Clemson University

Graduated in August 2017.  Finished classes in December 2016 and did coop engineering internship with International Paper from January to July, 2017.  As of August 14, 2017 he is a full time packaging engineer for Smithfield Foods, located at the corporate office in Smithfield VA.  His work includes 60% travel to 8 plants in North Carolina and Mid-West, responding to problems in packaging and working with vendors to develop and integrate better packaging for products.

Jeannette

UDC community college, then Latin America Youth Center

 Became a Certified Medical Assistant in August, 2015, from the Latin American Youth Center. At first, Jeannette was working as an administrative CMA.  Since March 2016, she has been working as a clinical Certified Medical Assistant for a primary care physician at the A+ Medical Clinic in Hyattsville. She also intends to get further certifications in specialized areas (e.g., phlebotomy).

DeAnjilo

Pepperdine University

Graduated in May 2015. Now a producer/editor for the National Football League Networks and a production assistant at Fox Sports West.

Hezouwe Happy

George Washington University

Graduated in May 2016.  In Peace Corps in Benin for next two years. [Interim student mentor to Marie before leaving.]  On return she plans to apply to graduate or medical school specializing in public health.

Cori

Ohio State University

Graduated in May 2017 with a B.A in Psychology and minor in Criminology and Criminal Justice. Currently Cori working with Ohio State Police Department in a junior officer position. She will be applying to be a police officer in December 2017.  Then she hopes transfer to the George Washington University Police division. While working she plans to earn her Masters in Forensic Psychology. 

Rainer

UDC

Graduated in May 2016, majored in civil engineering with a specialty in concrete structures.  In early summer 2016 he married and moved to California. His plans of getting a job and applying to U. California San Jose for a Masters degree in structural engineering have been deferred by the current crisis facing the immigrant community in the US.  He is applying for a waiver to allow him to work.  He will move to Boston in September 2017.

Raven

Bennett College for Women

Graduated in May 2017. She majored in social work and plans to go directly into a masters program in social work after college.

Sherve’

Oglethorpe University

Rising senior, scheduled to graduate in spring, 2017.

Kasey

Loyola University in New Orleans

Difficulties. May not complete.

Chanel

Temple University

Rising senior in five-year program, scheduled to graduate in spring, 2018, with BS in Civil Engineering and Certificate from Fox School of Business.  Had strong junior year. Active in Temple and regional chapters of National Society of Black Engineers. Spent summer of 2016 on internship and summer of 2017 interning with an engineering firm in Philadelphia.  [Mentor to Bakari]

Nijah

Virginia Tech

Rising Senior in five-year program, scheduled to graduate in spring, 2018. Spent summer of 2016 in California on internship. [Mentor to Ahmad.]

Rajanique

Furman University

Graduated in spring, 2017.

Ana

Trinity, transferred to UDC

Not full-time, hence no MJS funding since 2014-15 (her freshman year).

Diana

Emory University

Rising Senior in 2017-18.  Got into Emory Business School in 2016. [Mentor to Dayasia]

 

 

Samantha

University of Wisconsin

Took 2016-spring term off, mid-sophomore year.  In fall 2016, she planned to go to community college in Madison with transferability of credits to U. Wisc.  No response from her; we suspect she is not in school.

Nadiyah

Temple University

Rising Senior.  [Mentor to Marie.]

Teasha

University of North Carolina, Charlotte

Rising Senior (scheduled to graduate spring, 2018).

Betel

Howard University

Rising Junior (scheduled to graduate spring, 2019). [Mentor to Alexis.]

Braswell

University of Arizona

Rising Junior (scheduled to graduate spring, 2019).

Jenifer

UDC

Rising Junior – on Dean’s list in first two years, all A’s in sophomore year, majoring in Biology.

Maryam

Virginia Tech

Rising Junior, scheduled to graduate spring, 2019. [Mentor to Tyrese White.]

Daniel

North Carolina Central, Durham

Rising Junior

Dayasia

Univ. of California at Santa Cruz

Rising Sophomore

Marie-Helene (Marie)

George Washington University

Rising Sophomore

Alexis

George Mason University

Rising Sophomore

Merhawi

University of Virginia

Rising Sophomore

Bakari

Howard University (transferred from Morehouse College between freshman and sophomore years)

Rising Sophomore

Enjolique

North Carolina A&T University

 

Entering Freshman

Ahmad

Virginia Tech

 

Entering Freshman

Tyrese

Ithaca College

 

Entering Freshman

Olivia

Naropa Univ. (LEAP year for credit); planning to enter Univ of Hawaii at Manoa in fall 2018

Entering Freshman

Hao

George Mason Univ.

Entering Freshman

 

 

 

Resources and Commitments

 

Table 1. Resources Mobilized in 2016-17: Sources

 

US $

Bethesda Friends Meeting

 

Meeting Allocation (Peace & Social Justice Committee)

4,000

Social Concerns Box + Contributions from Individuals in Meeting

14,256

BFM Total

18,256

Friends Meeting of Washington

 

Meeting Allocation

5,000

FMW Individuals and Fund-raising

12,859

FMW Total

17,859

Langley Hill Friends Meeting

 

Meeting Allocation

300

           Individuals

996

           Langley Hill Total

1,296

 Total Contributions

37,411

 

 

 

 

Table 2. Mary Jane Simpson Scholarship Resources,

Commitments, and Net Reserve

Resources

 

Fund Balance 6/30/20161

99,616

Funding Mobilized in 2016-172

37,411

Remittances in 2016-2017

  (29,144)

Ending Balance 6/30/20173

107,883

 

 

Commitments  (assuming $2,000 for current seniors only)

 

3 Seniors @ $2,000

(6,000.00)

5 Juniors @ $1,500+$1,500

(15,000.00)

5 Sophomores @$1,500+$1,500+$1,500

(22,500.00)

5 Freshmen @ $1,500+$1,500+$1,500+$1,500

(30,000.00)

Total Commitments

(73,500.00)

 

 

Net Reserve

34,383

 

 

 

 

­­­­­­­____________________________

 

1 Includes $3,000 of BFM FY16 contributions that were transferred to FMW in early FY17.

2 Includes $426 transferred to FMW from Langley Hill Meeting in July, 2017, that was mobilized from fund-raising concert in June 2017, and $474 soon to be transferred to FMW from BFM FY17 fund-raising.

3. Ibid

 

 

FMW Property Committee

Annual Report

September 2017

 

This report covers the period from April 2016 (the date of our last annual report) through July 2017.

 

Major projects completed and charged to the Property or Capital Reserve Fund include:

 

  • 2nd floor restroom, Carriage House
     
  • “Temporary” restroom, Carriage House
     
  • Corrected water penetration problem into Decatur Place Room (DPR)
     
  • Renovated DPR (including mold abatement / repair of water damage, addition of closets for storage of nursery equipment and furniture, upgrade of electric service, replacement of flooring, and deep cleaning of existing rug)
     
  • Renovated the Administrative Secretary / Event Manager’s office to make her work environment more pleasant as well as to create a welcoming environment for the many visitors / event rental customers she receives.

 

The committee has reviewed furnishing needs for our campus and has begun implementing a plan to upgrade furnishings in various meeting spaces. We have:

 

  • Reupholstered sofas in the Parlor
     
  • Ordered chairs for DPR and Quaker House Living Room (QHLR), an upgrade of our mismatched folding chairs
     
  • Determined what we want in the DPR and North Room and have begun looking for suitable pieces

 

We have continued our focus on making the campus more environmentally friendly and inclusive to all. We have:

 

  • Implemented a composting program through a contract with Veteran Composting.  Each week, the company picks up our green compost bin in the kitchen and leaves behind a fresh one.

 

  • Identified a plan for solar panel installation on the west slope of the Meeting House roof.

 

  • Agreed to move forward with the purchase of electricity generated using wind power for the balance of our campus electricity usage.

 

  • Installed gender-neutral restroom signs throughout campus to make our buildings more welcoming to transgender individuals and to those of all gender identities.

 

  • Reviewed a set of recommendations received from a Friend concerned about the accessibility of our campus and we are in the process of implementing many of them.

 

Working with the Capital Improvement Task Force, we are developing plans to upgrade and expand the Assembly Room, both for our own use and as event space.  In-house staff has improved window wells for efficiency and appearance. 

 

The committee also looks ahead to identify repairs and improvements that may be required in the next few years.  These include:

 

  • Replacement of Meeting room HVAC
     
  • Replacement of Meeting house roof (a portion of which will be done in the near future if the Meeting approves the installation of solar panels)
     
  • Refinish floor in QHLR
     
  • Correct roof leak in QHLR and repaint

 

Longer term projects include:
 

  • Expansion/replacement of 2nd floor QH kitchen
     
  • Removal of steep western stairwell in QH, which does not does not meet code and will not be needed post-renovation
     
  • Addition of fire suppression as spaces become vacant in QH and CH
     
  • Address auditory issues in Meeting Room

 

We continue to work closely with other Meeting committees in an attempt to meet the Meeting's multiple needs while being sensitive to budget constraints and the special demands of the probable renovation project. We are exploring with the city the installation of a crosswalk at the intersection of Florida Avenue and Decatur Place, as well as designated handicapped parking near the new elevator entrance.

 

We coordinate and help to plan and report event rental activity, including fees and the implementation of the relaxation of the alcohol policy.

 

The committee wishes to acknowledge the overwhelming contributions of Ken Orvis, Property Manager, and Debby Churchman, Administrative Secretary and Events Manager, without whom we could not function. 

 

Respectfully submitted,

Brian Lutenegger, Merry Pearlstein (Co-clerks), Jay Harris, Justin Kwong, Alex Mathews, Ken Orvis, David Miller 

 

 

Hospitality Committee Annual Report

September 2017

 

Hospitality Committee welcomes our Meeting members, attenders, and guests at the rise of Worship each First Day. We provide coffee and tea service, water and lemonade, serve the bounty provided by our community and do a spectacular cleanup.

Kate Steger, co-clerk, and Margo Greenlee coordinate Souper Sunday, recruiting soup chefs and bakers to ensure that those who attend Meeting for Business do so with adequate sustenance.

The lists below reflects who sets-up, greets, serves, and cleans-up, some of whom are members of the committee, some of whom are currently active on the committee but not listed, and some are listed but inactive.

 

Active

  • Greyson Aquiavia – as schedule allows
  • Pam Callard                                  
  • Leonard Eoussa                         
  • Kathy Lipp Farr
  • Margo Greenlee
  • Susan Griffin
  • Sarah Radomsky
  • Kate Steger

 

Inactive

  • Malachy Kilbride – not reporting
  • Tom Libbert – retired after stellar service
  • Greg Robb – now clerk of Ministry and Worship, pitching in as needed
  • Jorge Sanchez – reassigned to Dad Duty

 

 

 

In a category all of their own:

 

In addition, two of our Clerks Emeriti, Bill Strein, and Alex Matthews, volunteer with the committee regularly.Alex Matthews, compost czar, also launders dishtowels and tablecloths.Bill Strein serves every third Sunday and has mentored Susan from the beginning of her tenure on the committee.As Bill approaches a decade of Hospitality Committee Service and takes on other significant responsibilities for the Meeting, he is planning to lay down KP.

 

Patty Murphy is an experienced kitchen-hand who responds readily to the committee’s entreaties for help and will often just poke her head in kitchen and see if we look bedraggled.

 

Bruce Kellogg and GT Hunt make sure that the early arrivals have coffee and cookies.

 

We continue to enjoy the once-monthly presence of First Day School Students who prepare cookies, cakes, or cupcakes to celebrate birthdays of FMW community members.Michael Beer and the Religious Education Committee offer the Family Brunch the first Sunday of the month, an event that nurtures and strengthens that essential part of our community.

 

In addition to regularly scheduled Sunday duties, the hospitality committee would like to organize quarterly kitchen cleaning days, but time and capacity have made this challenging. Hospitality "floaters" or back-stoppers would be very helpful. 

 

We strive to make the FMW kitchen a conflict-free zone. To that end, we plan to create a Friendly Handout on Food Contributions to guide members and attenders on leaving food and other items in the kitchen for community use. We'll share the handout with the Committee of Clerks when ready and keep a laminated copy in the kitchen. We hope this will help keep the refrigerator clean, the cupboards uncluttered, and the food we serve safe and sanitary. We also do this with the intention of respecting the limitations of a stretched committee. While hospitality is a valuable and important aspect of our community, simplicity is also a Quaker testimony we can rely on to guide us towards harmony and good cheer in the kitchen. 

 

Lastly, we expect that the proposed construction will impact hospitality and we welcome advanced discussion with other committees on what we should expect and how we might mitigate disruption while maintaining some modified hospitality. 

 

As indicated above, we need and would very much appreciate additional help. Like everyone in our Meeting, we are called to responsibilities and travel that take us away from Sunday service. This means that members and supporters of the committee may work alone on Sunday or work more than one Sunday a month.This is not optimal.

 

In order to be adequately staffed, we require two or three additional people who are available to be called upon to serve on an as-needed basis.This would ensure that there are 4-hands available for every First Day.Please consider joining our ministry of welcoming and community.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Susan Griffin & Kate Steger, Co-Clerks

 

[1] To respect students’ privacy, their last names and con

 

 

 

tact inf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resources and Commitments

 

Table 1. Resources Mobilized in 2016-17: Sources

 

US $

Bethesda Friends Meeting

 

Meeting Allocation (Peace & Social Justice Committee)

4,000

Social Concerns Box + Contributions from Individuals in Meeting

14,256

BFM Total

18,256

Friends Meeting of Washington

 

Meeting Allocation

5,000

FMW Individuals and Fund-raising

12,859

FMW Total

17,859

Langley Hill Friends Meeting

 

Meeting Allocation

300

           Individuals

996

           Langley Hill Total

1,296

 Total Contributions

37,411

 

 

 

 

Table 2. Mary Jane Simpson Scholarship Resources,

Commitments, and Net Reserve

Resources

 

Fund Balance 6/30/20161

99,616

Funding Mobilized in 2016-172

37,411

Remittances in 2016-2017

  (29,144)

Ending Balance 6/30/20173

107,883

 

 

Commitments  (assuming $2,000 for current seniors only)

 

3 Seniors @ $2,000

(6,000.00)

5 Juniors @ $1,500+$1,500

(15,000.00)

5 Sophomores @$1,500+$1,500+$1,500

(22,500.00)

5 Freshmen @ $1,500+$1,500+$1,500+$1,500

(30,000.00)

Total Commitments

(73,500.00)

 

 

Net Reserve

34,383

 

 

 

 

­­­­­­­____________________________

 

1 Includes $3,000 of BFM FY16 contributions that were transferred to FMW in early FY17.

2 Includes $426 transferred to FMW from Langley Hill Meeting in July, 2017, that was mobilized from fund-raising concert in June 2017, and $474 soon to be transferred to FMW from BFM FY17 fund-raising.

3. Ibid

 

 

FMW Property Committee

Annual Report

September 2017

 

This report covers the period from April 2016 (the date of our last annual report) through July 2017.

 

Major projects completed and charged to the Property or Capital Reserve Fund include:

 

  • 2nd floor restroom, Carriage House
     
  • “Temporary” restroom, Carriage House
     
  • Corrected water penetration problem into Decatur Place Room (DPR)
     
  • Renovated DPR (including mold abatement / repair of water damage, addition of closets for storage of nursery equipment and furniture, upgrade of electric service, replacement of flooring, and deep cleaning of existing rug)
     
  • Renovated the Administrative Secretary / Event Manager’s office to make her work environment more pleasant as well as to create a welcoming environment for the many visitors / event rental customers she receives.

 

The committee has reviewed furnishing needs for our campus and has begun implementing a plan to upgrade furnishings in various meeting spaces. We have:

 

  • Reupholstered sofas in the Parlor
     
  • Ordered chairs for DPR and Quaker House Living Room (QHLR), an upgrade of our mismatched folding chairs
     
  • Determined what we want in the DPR and North Room and have begun looking for suitable pieces

 

We have continued our focus on making the campus more environmentally friendly and inclusive to all. We have:

 

  • Implemented a composting program through a contract with Veteran Composting.  Each week, the company picks up our green compost bin in the kitchen and leaves behind a fresh one.

 

  • Identified a plan for solar panel installation on the west slope of the Meeting House roof.

 

  • Agreed to move forward with the purchase of electricity generated using wind power for the balance of our campus electricity usage.

 

  • Installed gender-neutral restroom signs throughout campus to make our buildings more welcoming to transgender individuals and to those of all gender identities.

 

  • Reviewed a set of recommendations received from a Friend concerned about the accessibility of our campus and we are in the process of implementing many of them.

 

Working with the Capital Improvement Task Force, we are developing plans to upgrade and expand the Assembly Room, both for our own use and as event space.  In-house staff has improved window wells for efficiency and appearance. 

 

The committee also looks ahead to identify repairs and improvements that may be required in the next few years.  These include:

 

  • Replacement of Meeting room HVAC
     
  • Replacement of Meeting house roof (a portion of which will be done in the near future if the Meeting approves the installation of solar panels)
     
  • Refinish floor in QHLR
     
  • Correct roof leak in QHLR and repaint

 

Longer term projects include:
 

  • Expansion/replacement of 2nd floor QH kitchen
     
  • Removal of steep western stairwell in QH, which does not does not meet code and will not be needed post-renovation
     
  • Addition of fire suppression as spaces become vacant in QH and CH
     
  • Address auditory issues in Meeting Room

 

We continue to work closely with other Meeting committees in an attempt to meet the Meeting's multiple needs while being sensitive to budget constraints and the special demands of the probable renovation project. We are exploring with the city the installation of a crosswalk at the intersection of Florida Avenue and Decatur Place, as well as designated handicapped parking near the new elevator entrance.

 

We coordinate and help to plan and report event rental activity, including fees and the implementation of the relaxation of the alcohol policy.

 

The committee wishes to acknowledge the overwhelming contributions of Ken Orvis, Property Manager, and Debby Churchman, Administrative Secretary and Events Manager, without whom we could not function. 

 

Respectfully submitted,

Brian Lutenegger, Merry Pearlstein (Co-clerks), Jay Harris, Justin Kwong, Alex Mathews, Ken Orvis, David Miller 

 

 

Hospitality Committee Annual Report

September 2017

 

Hospitality Committee welcomes our Meeting members, attenders, and guests at the rise of Worship each First Day. We provide coffee and tea service, water and lemonade, serve the bounty provided by our community and do a spectacular cleanup.

Kate Steger, co-clerk, and Margo Greenlee coordinate Souper Sunday, recruiting soup chefs and bakers to ensure that those who attend Meeting for Business do so with adequate sustenance.

The lists below reflects who sets-up, greets, serves, and cleans-up, some of whom are members of the committee, some of whom are currently active on the committee but not listed, and some are listed but inactive.

 

Active

  • Greyson Aquiavia – as schedule allows
  • Pam Callard                                  
  • Leonard Eoussa                         
  • Kathy Lipp Farr
  • Margo Greenlee
  • Susan Griffin
  • Sarah Radomsky
  • Kate Steger

 

Inactive

  • Malachy Kilbride – not reporting
  • Tom Libbert – retired after stellar service
  • Greg Robb – now clerk of Ministry and Worship, pitching in as needed
  • Jorge Sanchez – reassigned to Dad Duty

 

 

 

In a category all of their own:

 

In addition, two of our Clerks Emeriti, Bill Strein, and Alex Matthews, volunteer with the committee regularly.Alex Matthews, compost czar, also launders dishtowels and tablecloths.Bill Strein serves every third Sunday and has mentored Susan from the beginning of her tenure on the committee.As Bill approaches a decade of Hospitality Committee Service and takes on other significant responsibilities for the Meeting, he is planning to lay down KP.

 

Patty Murphy is an experienced kitchen-hand who responds readily to the committee’s entreaties for help and will often just poke her head in kitchen and see if we look bedraggled.

 

Bruce Kellogg and GT Hunt make sure that the early arrivals have coffee and cookies.

 

We continue to enjoy the once-monthly presence of First Day School Students who prepare cookies, cakes, or cupcakes to celebrate birthdays of FMW community members.Michael Beer and the Religious Education Committee offer the Family Brunch the first Sunday of the month, an event that nurtures and strengthens that essential part of our community.

 

In addition to regularly scheduled Sunday duties, the hospitality committee would like to organize quarterly kitchen cleaning days, but time and capacity have made this challenging. Hospitality "floaters" or back-stoppers would be very helpful. 

 

We strive to make the FMW kitchen a conflict-free zone. To that end, we plan to create a Friendly Handout on Food Contributions to guide members and attenders on leaving food and other items in the kitchen for community use. We'll share the handout with the Committee of Clerks when ready and keep a laminated copy in the kitchen. We hope this will help keep the refrigerator clean, the cupboards uncluttered, and the food we serve safe and sanitary. We also do this with the intention of respecting the limitations of a stretched committee. While hospitality is a valuable and important aspect of our community, simplicity is also a Quaker testimony we can rely on to guide us towards harmony and good cheer in the kitchen. 

 

Lastly, we expect that the proposed construction will impact hospitality and we welcome advanced discussion with other committees on what we should expect and how we might mitigate disruption while maintaining some modified hospitality. 

 

As indicated above, we need and would very much appreciate additional help. Like everyone in our Meeting, we are called to responsibilities and travel that take us away from Sunday service. This means that members and supporters of the committee may work alone on Sunday or work more than one Sunday a month.This is not optimal.

 

In order to be adequately staffed, we require two or three additional people who are available to be called upon to serve on an as-needed basis.This would ensure that there are 4-hands available for every First Day.Please consider joining our ministry of welcoming and community.

 

Respectfully submitted,

 

Susan Griffin & Kate Steger, Co-Clerks

 

William Penn House

Report to Friends Meeting of Washington

September 2017

The past year has been a time of transition, reflection, and new growth at William Penn House.  In September of 2016, we marked 50 years of Quaker service, hospitality, and witness on Capitol Hill.  To commemorate this milestone, we held a daylong celebration with service projects in the morning led by our Quaker workcamp program and an open house in the afternoon, complete with visits from William Penn and Lucretia Mott!  The day proved a joyful way to bring the William Penn House community together to celebrate our history.

In December, our longtime Program Director, Brad Ogilvie, moved on to pursue new leadings after 10 years of service at William Penn House.  Brad’s passionate and prophetic leadership of our workcamps and educational programs transformed and deepened our service and activism.  We have been fortunate to have Naomi Madaras ably stepping into this role this year.

Our service-learning and social justice education programs have grown this year, serving more groups from schools, colleges, and religious congregations than in past years.  Participants came from Quaker schools and meetings, Methodist and Presbyterian Churches, four colleges, and an international youth leadership program run by Indiana University.

Our service-learning programs have supported 10 grassroots non-profits providing service and dignity for the marginalized and working to build a more just, caring, and healthy community.  Key partners have included DC Urban Greens (an urban agriculture / food justice program), Our Daily Bread (a community breakfast on Capitol Hill), and Capitol Hill Village (an aging-in-place support network).

Our public policy seminars introduced college students to the world of social-justice advocacy and policy-making in Washington.  Students met with staff at FCNL, the AFSC Washington office, and many other advocacy organizations, as well as members of congress and officials in executive branch agencies and international organizations.

We have also continued longstanding relationships with communities in southern Louisiana and McDowell County, WV, with our annual week-long Quaker workcamps.  In March, we led a group of high-schoolers to Louisiana for the 12th year, to serve and learn in New Orleans and with the Ile de Jean-Charles native community.  In June, we led another group to West Virginia for our 17th annual workcamp with a community-based non-profit, providing simple home repairs for community members.

Our program of radical Quaker hospitality has also expanded this year, serving more guests and also focusing more on supporting social justice witness and activism in this new era of political engagement.  We opened our doors as a “comfort station” for the Women’s March on Washington in January and the People’s Climate March in April.  Each day, hundreds of marchers stopped in for a bathroom, snack, and a place to relax and make connections with other marchers.  It was a special joy to have Friends from across the country visit during these marches.  We also supported FCNL’s Interfaith Vigil to Save Medicaid in late June, providing logistical support and hospitality for this important event of Quaker witness.

Beyond these large events, we have hosted hundreds of citizen-activists coming to Washington to advocate for a more just world.  The Student-Farmworker Alliance, AIDS United, Citizen’s Climate Lobby, Young Evangelicals for Climate Action, and the Center for Popular Democracy were among the activist groups we were able to host and support in their witness.  The opportunity to share in these advocacy efforts has been exciting and humbling to us.

In financial terms, this year has been one of dramatic turnaround.  Most importantly, we resolved our lawsuit with the DC government about our property tax assessment. We reached a satisfactory compromise agreement with the city.  Thanks to generous contributions from Friends, we paid the balance due and are moving forward with a small additional expense.  The lawsuit and staff transitions took a toll on our finances and program activities, but in the past year program revenues and contributions have increased, putting us on the path toward financial sustainability.

In the coming year, we look forward to expanding our support for Quaker citizen-activism and social justice education, providing both tools and care to people from all walks of life who are working for a more just, peaceful, and inclusive community and world.  William Penn House was founded in 1966 with a vision of a space of welcome and inclusion, just blocks from the U.S. Capitol, where Friends and other social-justice advocates can come together to learn, dialogue, organize, and build community.  Today, this work is needed more than ever, and with the generous support of Friends, we are looking forward to continuing to improve and expand our programs and make needed investments in facilities and personnel to live out this vision for the next 50 years.

 

Andrei Israel, Executive Director

_____________________________________________________________________

(This ends the minutes and reports of 9.2017)

UPCOMING EVENTS

Sept. 29 – Oct. 1:  Young Friends Conference, Goose Creek Friends Meeting, Lincoln, VA.  Young Friends should plan to begin arriving at 7:00 pm on Friday. For information, check the Young Friends website (www.bym-rsf.org/what_we_do/yfs/yfcon.html) or contact Jocelyn Dowling. (301-774-7663) Please remember that the deadline to register and be guaranteed a slot is two weeks before the conference (September 15). Any one registering after that date will be placed on a waiting list and may not be able to attend.

Sept. 29 – Oct. 1:  Catoctin Quaker Camp 60th Anniversary, Thurmont, MD.  This summer marks the 60th year we have been holding camp at Catoctin! Join us for this historic celebration. It's a weekend of reminiscing, singing around the campfire, frazzlyram, short hikes on the mountain, great camp food, and catching up with old friends. Enjoy the history and familiarity of camp, the physical heart of our beloved community for the last 60 years, while also experiencing the brand new bathhouse - a key component in building a sustainable future for our camp, and the mountain we call home, for the next 50 years. For more information and to register, go to the Registration page.

October 1: World Quaker Day, in which we Friends celebrate world-wide our different ways of worship, tradiitons, and practices. This year’s theme is Gathering in Worship Around the World. To learn more and to share how you worship, please visit: www.worldquakerday.org

October 1:  Friends are invited to a potluck and Quaker dialogue at William Penn House, starting at 6:30 pm. Peter Toscano will display his artful, playful, outrageously funny, and deeply moving storytelling craft. Bring a dish to share. 515 East Capitol St. SE, www.williampennhouse.org, 202.543.5560

Oct. 4: Help make sandwiches for the Grate Patrol to take to our vulnerable neighbors, starting at 5:30 pm. For more information, contact Steve Brooks at sbrooks@uab.edu

Oct. 6 to 9:  Silent Retreat for Friends  Is your spirit in need of nourishment and refreshment? Come to the Silent Retreat at Dayspring for Baltimore Yearly Meeting Friends.  We will keep the silence from Friday evening until after worship on Monday, enjoying the beauty of God’s creation in meadows and woods, walking, resting, praying, reading, finding our own rhythms, listening for the Still Small Voice.

WHERE: Dayspring Retreat  Center, 11301 Neelsville Church Rd., Germantown, MD 20876 (301-916-1131). 

FACILITATOR:  Jean Christianson, Member of Annapolis Friends Meeting                        

ARRIVAL: 3:30 -7:00 p.m. Friday. (Dinner at 7 p.m.)  DEPARTURE: 2:00 p.m. Monday.            

ACCOMMODATIONS: Individual room in the Inn with Bible, bed, desk, sink, bed linens, blankets, towels and washcloth.  9 vegetarian meals in the Lodge dining room.  Gatherings in the Yoke Room for community worship and shared solitude by the fireplace. 200 acres for roaming. 

COST: $300.  

REGISTRATION: Deadline September 29th  (if not filled earlier). Minimum number is 9 participants.  Maximum is 18.  Friends will be enrolled in the order in which checks are received. 

BRING: Toilet articles, casual clothes, walking shoes, and a flashlight. Long socks and hats are recommended to deter ticks. 

QUESTIONS? Call Jean Christianson at 410-544-1912 or e-mail jschristianson@gmail. com .       

DIRECTIONS: From I-270 take the Damascus exit (#15-A), Route 118 to the north.  Go 8/10 of a mile on Route 118 to MD Route 355.  Turn left on MD Route 355 and go a VERY SHORT block.  Turn right on Neelsville Church Rd.  Continue 6/10 of a mile on Neelsville Church Rd. to Dayspring Retreat Center. OR  From I-70 take Route 27 south at Mount Airy.  It will merge into 355 (Frederick Rd.) continuing south.  Turn left onto Neelsville Church Rd. (just before reaching Route 118) and follow directions above.

The emergency telephone number for Dayspring is 301-916-1131

Make check for $300 payable to Dayspring Retreat Center and send with registration form to Jean Christianson, 189 Edgewater Rd., Pasadena, MD 21122

 

Oct. 7:  Help make breakfast for our vulnerable neighbors. Convene at 6:15 am at So Others Might Eat. For more information, contact Tim Schleicher at timothy.c.schleicher@gmail.com

Oct. 7:  Friends Wilderness Center Work Day  Come and help us complete some needed chores in the Niles cabin, yard, and on the nearby trails. Enjoy the special fellowship that is part and parcel of shared work. Donate your time and effort and receive in return a great home-cooked lunch (free of charge) and the special gifts of the Blue Ridge beauty in Fall. Please RSVP to Sheila Bach to assist her in meal planning. Note: If this will be your first time visiting FWC, please be sure to read the Directions page on our website - www.friendswilderness.org - to avoid getting lost or arriving later than intended. If you download the free WAZE directions system, it will bring you directly to our door. The work will begin at 10am and conclude by 4. Please let Sheila Bach (snbach@earthlink.net) know that you will be joining in the fun on work day so that she can purchase enough food for everyone.

Oct. 14:  Tenth Month Interim Meeting, Homewood Friends Meeting, Baltimore, MD.  Get to know Yearly Meeting Committees and Friends from other Meetings! Be a part of important decision making. Join Friends for morning committee meetings and the afternoon’s Interim Business Meeting. Homewood Friends Meeting will host the Tenth Month Interim Meeting. Friends will begin gathering at 10:00am. Committee meetings will begin at 10:30. Check the Yearly Meeting website for more information.

November 2 – 3FCNL Quaker Public Policy Institute and Lobby Day, Washington Court Hotel (Washington, DC)  FCNL very much wishes to extend a hand to Friends who are fired-up to engage and impact Congress in accordance with Quaker values and spirit-led advocacy efforts. Friends who are looking for the change-making resources, structures and accompaniment of other Friends across the country will find all of that at the friends Committee on national Public Policy Institute taking place November 2-3, 2017 in Washington, DC. First-time attendees as well returning Friends can register at a reduced cost from $50-$125, with most meals included. Travel can be financed through FCNL. Do not let funding get in your way of attending this transformative Quaker gathering. For more information and to register, see www.fcnl.org/annualmeeting.

 

November 2 – 5Retreat for Friends of Color, Stony Point Center (Stony Point, NY)  FGC’s Ministry on Racism Program is sponsoring a Fall Gathering for Friends of Color and their immediate family members. This fall, FGC’s Ministry on Racism Program is sponsoring an opportunity for Friends of Color and their families to come together to build multigenerational community through:

  • Mutual support and sharing
  • Worship & Exploring our Faith
  • Sharing ways to heal ourselves in these turbulent times
  • Spend time tightening the bonds among us

Friends of European descent are welcome provided they are attending with a family member (e.g. spouse, child) who is a Person of Color. For more information or to register, go to www.fgcquaker.org/2017-retreat-friends-color.